Written by PYR Ambassador Jena Morrison

It’s no secret that for many of us the holidays are stressful. Kids are home from school for a few weeks. There’s shopping and errands to be done amidst all the traffic. And, a lot of us spend time on the road traveling to be with family and friends. If that’s not stressful enough, the change in seasons to cold, dreary days makes even getting out of bed sound that much more unappealing. This often means that stress is at its peak during this time of year.

So, how do we deal with stress? There are several ways to deal with stress, but not all of them are necessarily “healthy”. Some of these less than healthy ways might include resorting to our favorite comfort foods, excessive shopping, or eyeing that bowl of egg nog. While these are not on their own negative things to do, taking them to extremes can end up making us feel worse while not actually addressing the stress itself. Luckily, there are a ton of other options that we can choose from to bring our stress levels down. These include things like exercise, journaling, reaching out to our support network of family and friends, and meditation.

Meditation, personally one of my favorites, is all about mindfulness. Mindfulness is simply defined as bringing one’s attention to the present moment in a non-judgmental way (1). This notion has been around for centuries; however, only recently has science decided to take a closer look at the practice of mindfulness. This includes a number of studies showing that mindfulness can be helpful in reducing perceived stress, anxiety, and depression, all of which can be exacerbated by the busy holiday season (2) (3) (4). If you’re intimidated by all of this, don’t be. Being mindful is really quite simple.

Being mindful doesn’t have to be anything overly formal or done in a specific pose. It can be as easy as taking a few moments to fully listen and appreciate your favorite song on the radio. It can be taking a few deep breaths and taking the time to appreciate the smell of your morning cup of coffee or cocoa. Or even taking 10 minutes to go outside, breathe in the crisp air, and focus on nothing but the coolness and nature around you. Taking even a moment or two here and there can add up. So whether you follow a formal seated practice 20 minutes a day or simply take a few moments here and there, it is still the same. And, mindfulness doesn’t even have to be still. Yoga is a way of making your meditation an active meditation since it requires you to focus solely on what is on your mat and your own experience.

So take a few moments over the next few weeks to catch your breath. And, if you want a more formal practice or want to learn more about meditation, come join us in the studio! Any of the Ambassadors would be happy to help you start your own practice or grow one that you already have.

References

(1) Kabat-Zinn, J. (2016). ‘This is not McMindfulness’. Psychologist, 29(2), 124-125

Lengacher, C., Shelton, M., Reich, R., Barta, M., Johnson-Mallard, V., Moscoso, M., & … Kip, K. (2014). Mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR(BC)) in breast cancer: evaluating fear of recurrence (FOR) as a mediator of psychological and physical symptoms in a randomized control trial (RCT). Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 37(2), 185-195. doi:10.1007/s10865-012-9473-6

(2) Cordon, S. L., Brown, K. W., & Gibson, P. R. (2009). The Role of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction on Perceived Stress: Preliminary Evidence for the Moderating Role of Attachment Style. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 23(3), 258-269. doi:10.1891/0889-8391.23.3.258

(3) Goldin, P. R., & Gross, J. J. (2010). Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder. Emotion, 10(1), 83-91. doi:10.1037/a0018441

(4) Song, Y., & Lindquist, R. (2015). Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on depression, anxiety, stress and mindfulness in Korean nursing students. Nurse Education Today, 3586-90. doi:10.1016/j.nedt.2014.06.010

 

Starting January 1st, join Jena Morrison for Mediation Wednesdays fro 6-6:30pm and join JaVonne Bowles on Fridays from 11-11:30 am!
Bring peace to your holiday season by practicing at Project Yoga Richmond!

*Christmas Eve Class: December 24, 9:30-11 am
Bhakti Flow with Elizabeth Shurte

*Closed Christmas Day, regular class schedule resumes Dec 26

*New Year’s Eve Class: Dec 31, 9:30-11am
Gentle Yoga and Meditation with Billie Southworth Carroll

* New Years Day Class: Jan 1, 3-5pm
Inside Out: Presence in Motion with Michele Nierle and Slash Coleman

Join the event on Facebook or visit our class schedule for more info!

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