4 Benefits of Yoga for Senior Citizens

In addition to the physical and mental benefits, yoga provides a sense of belonging and community. One of the populations where we have seen these benefits is when offer Yoga for Seniors. 

“This particular site started as a residence for Russian seniors. One of the first things I noticed was that all of my students, regardless of nationality, began to look out for each other. They took interest in what was going on with their fellow yogis, despite nationality. I have called it my mini-UN because the population is so diverse!” – Sarah Humphries (PYR Ambassador at Marywood)

Project Yoga Richmond has offered Yoga for Seniors since 2012, and we currently offer programs at Marywood Senior Apartments with Sarah Humphries (PYR Ambassador) and Senior Center East at Peter Paul Development Center with Twylah Ekko (PYR Ambassador).

 

Benefits of Yoga for Seniors
  1. Sense of belonging and community
  2. Improvements in mobility, overall health, and emotional well-being
  3. Increased confidence, independence, agency, and creativity
  4. Increased mobility, strength, and balance
What are some elements of our Yoga for Seniors classes?
  • Similar sequences each week
  • Low impact, gentle movement using the support of the chair; balancing poses using the support of the chair (if needed);
  • Breathing techniques and meditation
  • Physical sequences are similar from week to week 
  • Senior Center EAST has a devotional at the end of class

Unroll your mat with us at our pay-what-you-can studio and Saturday Salutations at the VMFA on August 5 as we highlight Yoga for Seniors.Support our outreach programs by paying-what-you-can when you sign up for this event! And know that anytime you pay-what-you-can for class at our studio 7-days a week, you are supporting outreach like this!

If you would like to learn more about how to support Yoga for youth or to sponsor one of our outreach programs, you can make a donation by clicking here 365 days a year or contact holly@projectyogarichmond.org for more information!

4 Ways Yoga Supports Youth

Did you know that 50% of Project Yoga Richmond’s outreach programs work with children and youth? We are dedicated to serving youth for a number of reasons! Here are just a few of the many benefits yoga and mindfulness provide for youth in your community!

1. Promotes social-emotional learning

Social-emotional learning develops 5 core competencies in students: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making. Yoga and meditation foster these core competencies.

Through a yoga and meditation practice, students first learn to bring awareness to their breath and physical body. By focusing on this connection, student become more able to feel and experience what is happening within the mind and bodies, developing stronger self-awareness.

As self-awareness emerges, students become more able to manage their emotions. When a thought or experience that would have formerly elicited an impulse reaction, students become more able to approach the situation by connecting to the breath and recognizing the emotion before acting. In turn, students are able to make more responsible decisions as they become less reactive and approach situations with more clarity.

With a newfound self-awareness and self-management skills, students are able to recognize not only what is happening within them, but what is happening around them as well, demonstrating improved social awareness and developed relationship skills.

2. Improves self-esteem and body image

As students practice and become more connected to their breath and their body, they can become more accepting and demonstrate self-compassion in a safe environment rooted in non-judgement.

Testimonial from outreach student at Boushall Middle School

3. Improves focus and school performance

Yoga may reduce classroom disturbances and enhance cognitive performance.

4. Improves physical health

Yoga improves respiratory functions, reduces stress, lowers blood pressure, and reduces obesity risk factors

So, how do we teach our Yoga for Youth outreach programs?

Each one of our outreach programs is unique, depending on the population that we are working with and the Ambassador that is teaching. But, we do like to keep a few key elements in mind!

1. Engage students in a variety of accessible physical postures
  • The physical posture sequences progress from week to week to build trust, confidence, and competency, while inviting creativity and playful exploration

2. Introduce breathing exercises, relaxation, and visualization techniques
  • This helps students cope with and reduce stress, improve focus/concentration and self-regulation, and promote a general sense of health and emotional well-being

3. Incorporate reflection activities and partner or group sharing
  • Many of our yoga classes include philosophy, journaling to offer a space for inquiry and sharing of voice and enhance communication skills

Currently, over 50% of Project Yoga Richmond’s outreach programs serve children and youth, particularly youth in Title 1 schools where 51% of students eligible for free and reduced lunch in Richmond City and Chesterfield County. In 2016 PYR led 226 classes specifically for children and youth, providing 1,648 yoga experiences, in both school and community center/agency settings through our outreach programs.

Over the past 6 years, Project Yoga Richmond has developed and implemented yoga programming for youth to provide these benefits throughout Greater Richmond. Currently, PYR offers recurring programming at the following Title 1 schools:

  • Binford Middle School (Partnership with Higher Achievement)
  • Falling Creek Middle School (Working with ESOL students)
  • Greene Elementary and Salem Church Middle School (Working with ESOL students, Partnership with Pasaporte a la Educacion of the Virginia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce)
  • Thomas Jefferson High School  
  • Henderson Middle School (Partnership with NextUp RVA)
  • T.C. Boushall Middle School (Partnership with NextUp RVA)

Project Yoga Richmond also partners with SwimRVA to offer yoga programming to youth from Peter Paul Development Center and with Robinson Theater Community Arts Center in the East End, working with George Mason Elementary youth.

Project Yoga Richmond receives evaluations from program participants, yoga instructors, and partner organization staff ton the impact of the yoga and mindfulness classes.  Many of them cite positive effects of yoga for adolescents, including:

  • Less anxiety
  • A greater sense of self and belonging
  • Developed the ability to self-monitor
  • Better focus
  • Felt less reactive

Unroll your mat with us at our pay-what-you-can studio and Saturday Salutations to support our yoga and mindfulness outreach programs and make transformations like this possible. You can support our outreach programs by paying-what-you-can when you pre-register for this event! And know that anytime you pay-what-you-can for class at our studio 7-days a week, you are supporting outreach like this!

Make an impact. Unroll your mat. Sign up for Saturday Salutations at the VMFA today to learn more about and support Yoga for Youth!

If you would like to learn more about how to support Yoga for youth or to sponsor one of our outreach programs, you can make a donation by clicking here 365 days a year or contact holly@projectyogarichmond.org for more information!

Works Cited

Wei, Marlynn. “7 Ways Yoga Helps Children and Teens.”Psychology Today. Sussex Publishers, 22 May 2015. Web. 20 June 2017.

“Yoga 4 Classrooms®.” Scientific Evidence for Yoga and Mindfulness in Schools: How and Why Does It Work? N.p., n.d. Web. 20 June 2017.

3 Ways Yoga Helps Direct Support Staff

In order to take care of others, we need to make sure we are taking care of ourselves. By offering trauma-informed yoga for staff who support populations in need, we were able to provide self-care and self-regulation tools to support building resilience in our community. This not only offers the tools to staff but provides them with the skill sets to offer basic self-care practices to the populations they work with as well. 

Safe Harbor Shelter provides support for survivors of domestic and sexual violence to overcome their crisis and to transform their lives. Staff who directly work with those who have experienced trauma have an increased likelihood of:

  • Secondary traumatic stress, also known as compassion fatigue
    • Compassion fatigue can lead to vicarious traumatization which can be common among caregivers after constant exposure to the trauma of others
  • Burnout
    • Enhanced by the physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion due to chronic work-related stress

These effects make it challenging to provide high-quality care to patients and may result in a high level of staff turnover. In order to prevent this from happening, Safe Harbor reached out to Project Yoga Richmond to provide meditation and self-care practices for staff. Project Yoga Richmond began offering yoga to the Direct Support Staff at Safe Harbour in September of 2015.Safe Harbor had a few goals for offering yoga and meditation to the staff in order to provide the best care possible. Each month, Project Yoga Richmond provides the space to encourage self-care and the tools to develop sensory awareness and self-regulation and to ground and center the team.  

Working with members of the community who have experienced and/or witnessed significant trauma, direct staff are especially at risk for compassion fatigue, vicarious trauma, and burn out.  It’s the organization’s goal to be intentional and proactive to avoid said issues by implementing a yoga and meditation program into the work week.

Two tips for teaching direct support staff:
  1. Gentle, trauma-sensitive movement using the support of the chair
    • This teaching style offers staff the tools to use these techniques at their desks when needed, making yoga and meditation accessible in a hectic work environment.
  2. Breathing techniques and meditation for staff to ground and center
    • The techniques develop self-regulation and build resilience.
 “The sessions really impact our day and get us in a good headspace, especially since Wednesday tend to be hectic around here.”
– Safe Harbor Staff Member
3 Ways Self-Care Practices Benefits Staff at Safe Harbor:
  1. General Wellness is provided as staff are empowered to practice yoga and meditation techniques and directly experience the benefits
  2. Organizational Wellness is demonstrated as staff is encouraged to create time and space for self-care practices during their work day and providing a community of support at work for those practices
  3. Education around the impacts of working with people who have experienced trauma is provided, as a well as a means of coping with the impacts

Help us support those who support others in your community by signing up and paying-what-you-can for Saturday Salutations at the VMFA highlighting Yoga for Direct Support Staff with Amy Taylor on June 10!

Pay-what-you-can for Saturday Salutations to help us make $900 to support yoga and mindfulness outreach programs like this across the Greater Richmond Region!
Works Cited

Menschner, Center Christopher, and Alexandra Maul. “Strategies for Encouraging Staff Wellness in Trauma-Informed Organizations.” Strategies for Encouraging Staff Wellness in Trauma-Informed Organizations (n.d.): n. pag. Center for Health Care Strategies. Web.

3 Tips for Teaching Yoga for Autism

Have you ever wondered how PYR’s outreach programs are different from a studio class? Or how yoga can impact different populations? At Project Yoga Richmond we are dedicated to finding the most impactful ways to share yoga with students of all abilities. As you help us make yoga accessible and affordable to all we want to make sure you know more about the impact your dollar makes when you unroll your mat with us!

 

Project Yoga Richmond has partnered with The Founders Center of Commonwealth Autism for the last four years and currently offers a weekly program serving students in their upper school, primarily serving youth/emerging adults ages 17-22. We see the impact these practices make in our students each time we unroll our mats.

Yoga holds a variety of benefits, some of which can be especially beneficial to youth and adults with autism. According to Autism Parenting Magazine, the results of a yoga practice can be especially beneficial to people with Autism. They found these 6 benefits to be among the top reasons for how yoga can benefit someone with autism.

1. Increased Social-Communication Skills
2. Awareness and Expression of Emotions
3. Reduced Anxiety
4. Reduction in Challenging Behaviors
5. Increased Body Awareness
6. Positive Sense of Self

We see many of these results in our students after they unroll their mats. One of our students from The Founder’s Center of Commonwealth Autism demonstrated all 6 of these benefits through a testimonial shared with a Project Yoga Richmond team member,

“I feel very calm and I can forget about the things that I do not like to think about. I calm down and then don’t need to be so upset anymore. I am grateful because you have taught me to control myself, thank you for your teachings, to be able to control my breath”

This testimonial conveys increased social-communication skills as the student was able to share with a PYR member about their personal experience on the mat. Awareness and expression of emotions is demonstrated in this testimonial by the student’s reflection on both calm and anxious emotions. The student shared that yoga helped to reduce anxiety by stating “I calm down” and demonstrates a reduction in challenging behaviors as the student shows self-regulation and control through the statement, “you have taught me how to control myself”. Increased body awareness is shown by the student’s ability to connect with and control his or her breath. Additionally, the student’s ability to positively share, reflect, and interact with others about his or her personal experiences demonstrates a positive sense of self.

Here are 3 things we do when we teach yoga at The Founders Center of Commonwealth Autism to best meet the needs of our students with Autism:

1. Start class by greeting each student by name as they are entering the room (specific verbal recognition is very important)

2. Providing verbal praise- again, specific verbal recognition– throughout the class

3. Incorporating sensory items into class

You can help us continue to bring the benefits of yoga to students with autism in your community. Start by joining us on May 27 for Saturday Salutations at the VMFA where Shannon Somogyi will share about teaching at The Founder’s Center for Commonwealth Autism as she leads the community in an all-levels yoga class on the VMFA deck. You can support our outreach programs by paying-what-you-can when you pre-register for this event! And know that anytime you pay-what-you-can for class at our studio 7-days a week, you are supporting outreach like this!

Make an impact. Unroll your mat. Sign up for Saturday Salutations at the VMFA today!

If you would like to learn more about how to support Yoga for Autism or to sponsor one of our outreach programs, you can make a donation by clicking here 365 days a year and you can contact holly@projectyogarichmond.org for more information!

 

A special thank you to Mc Abbott Studios for providing all imagery content in this blog post!

A Practice for New Parents

A Practice for New Parents

By: Kim Catley

There’s a Zen proverb that tells us to let go or be dragged.

Parenthood is one of the great lessons in proving that statement. At a time when your life changes overnight, it’s hard to let go of the comfort and routine you found in your practice.

While juggling kids and groceries and work, I sat down with PYR ambassador Izzy Shurte to talk about how our practices have changed since bring babies on board.

Be patient.

First of all, moms, your body is probably going to need time before it’s ready to flow. You spent months growing a human, you went through labor, you’re struggling with crazy sleep and wake schedules. Don’t expect to hop back on your mat and dive into a power flow (but that’s awesome if you do!).

Izzy had diastasis recti, a separation of the abdominal muscles, and had to avoid core work for a year after giving birth. The demands of breastfeeding also left her craving a slower flow. So she traded her typical sweaty, aggressive practice for whatever aligned with her body that day.

“Just roll out your mat and don’t have any expectations,” she says. “Do what feels good. Maybe it’s holding a lunge for 10 minutes. Maybe it’s starting slow and then leaning in a bit. Whatever happens is fine. Don’t make it stressful; make it organic.”

 

Be creative.

The schedule of a new parent doesn’t always align with a studio schedule. You might not be ready for practice until 9:30 p.m., after dinner is made, dishes put away, and kids are bathed and in bed. Or you’ll try to squeeze in a home flow during naptime, only for your baby to wake up after just 15 minutes.

Having a home practice gives you flexibility to squeeze in a quick session when you find a small pocket of time, even if it means getting up a little early before your house comes to life. Have 10 minutes? Find mountain pose, connect with your breath, go through a few sun salutations, and pause in a brief savasana. Even that small practice can help you feel grounded.

I love getting lost in someone else’s sequences, so I’ll pull up an online class. I can find a length that fits my schedule, and choose a focus area or style that matches what I need.

I also remind myself that yoga is much more than poses, and I can find other ways to incorporate the practice in my daily life. For instance, every night, I sit with my son until he falls asleep in my arms. I hold him close and deepen my breathing, gradually feeling him do the same. He relaxes, letting go of his fidgets and squirms. I take the time to really be with him, undistracted, and notice the subtle changes that are happening every day. It’s my new daily meditation.

Be with your baby.

Don’t have someone to leave your baby with while you head to the studio? Bring her along!

Several Richmond studios offer mom and baby yoga classes, including one at Project Yoga Richmond. It’s hosted by Nurture RVA, a local pre- and post-natal resource, so check their website for a schedule and details.

Nurture’s Baby and Me Yoga class is shaped by the babies in attendance. If everyone is awake and active, you’ll move and sing and play with your baby. If they’re having a snoozy day, you might sneak in a little flow. Bonus: you’ll get to connect with other parents and postnatal experts who can help you navigate the challenges of early parenthood (I learned how bouncing on an exercise ball calmed and soothed a crying infant when nothing else seemed to work).

When the weather turns warm, you also might be able to take advantage of some open-air classes, like Project Yoga Richmond’s Saturday Salutations at the VMFA. I showed up a few times with baby in tow and set up in the grass where he had room to wiggle, and I could quietly sneak out if things took a turn.

This can also apply at home. At first, Izzy wanted to get back to her serious and regimented practice. “I thought I had to have 90 minutes alone in a closed room while my husband watched her.” Now she’s learned that having her daughter nearby — sometimes watching Elmo, sometimes climbing all over her — has made her practice more playful. “It’s our joint self-care routine.”

Be with others.

Wherever your practice takes you, try to find your tribe.

Maybe that’s chatting up the mom sitting next to you in Baby and Me Yoga. Or maybe you meet a friend for class and grab dinner after. Just like you need to find balance in your practice, you need to find balance in life — and sometimes that means a little time on your own.

 

Thank you to all the amazing people who support our efforts to make yoga accessible to all, regardless of age, income, or financial ability! Visit us 7 days a week and pay-what-you-can at our studio and/or give online to make magic moments like this possible for everyone in your community through our yoga and mindfulness outreach programs!

The latest on classes and special events, plus an inside look at how practicing with PYR helps our community. Sign up here.